SMART(Y) Goals

Coach Becs
You may have heard of SMART goals – at My Human Coach we’ve got our own version, SMARTY goals!

A traditional SMART goal is one that is Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Relevant and Time Bound.

For example, if I want to run in a local 5k on Thansgiving Day, my SMART goal might look like this:

“I want to run the Turkey Trot, so starting tomorrow, I am going to train Monday, Wednesday and Friday at 4pm at the high school track for 10 weeks so I can be ready by Thanksgiving.”

  • Specific – Train three times a week at 4pm at the high school track
  • Measurable – Time, distance
  • Achievable – Yes, I can already run 2.5 miles so I feel like this is something I can do if I train consistently
  • Relevant – Training 3x a week will help me get in shape to run the whole distance
  • Time Bound – 10 weeks, between now and Thanksgiving

Research shows SMART goals make reaching a goal more likely because they include a plan! But our (human; ) coaches decided the SMART goal wasn’t quite enough, because it was missing the “Y”

The “Why” is important! There are lots of challenges on the way to a goal – but connecting your actions with the reason the goal exists makes it easier to persevere through difficulties.

Compare these three different types of goals:

Basic Goal:

“I want to run a 5k”

SMART Goal:

“I want to run a 5k, so starting tomorrow, I am going to train Monday, Wednesday and Friday at 4pm at the high school track for 10 weeks so I can run the Turkey Trot on Thanksgiving Day.”

SMARTY Goal

“I want to run a 5k, so starting tomorrow, I am going to train Monday, Wednesday and Friday at 4pm at the high school track for 10 weeks so I can run the Turkey Trot on Thanksgiving Day. I’m doing this to support my best friend who runs this race every year, but can’t this year because she is recovering from knee surgery. I will live stream the race so we can “run” it together!

You can see the difference! A SMARTY goal connects you to the bigger meaning behind your goal. For example, as coaches, we’ve seen people set SMART goals to lose weight, and their “why” is to be able to run and play with their grandchildren. Or they set

SMART goals to change their eating habits with “whys” like reducing cholesterol or have more energy to travel. (I made a SMARTY goal to get on a budget to save up an emergency fund. My “why” is because it will reduce my anxiety about having enough money in the bank to cover something like car repairs.)

SMART goals are great for defining specific steps toward reaching your goals – add the “Y” to make a SMARTY goal and you connect those steps to the bigger picture of what you value, and what feels most important to you right now.

Answer the questions below to create a SMARTY goal or use this printable PDF to fill out your own SMARTY goal that you can post on the refrigerator or bathroom mirror! And if you’d like to learn more about connecting with a 1:1 human coach to talk about your health and wellness SMARTY goals you can Get a Coach here.

(For some examples of some of our coach’s SMARTY goals, go to the next page :)

Coach Rebecca’s SMARTY Goal

My goal is to: Lose 10 lbs

This means I will (make it specific): Stick to a calorie budget 6 days a week

I will measure it by: Logging my food every day except Saturday

I believe this goal is accessible to me because: I was able to download a food logging app I like on my phone and practice using it, so I feel ready to make it a part of my daily routine.

I think this is relevant because: I really like to eat and sometimes I don’t realize how many calories I’m consuming, which makes it harder to lose weight.

My time frame for doing this is: Over the next three months.

My WHY is: Since I tore my ACL skiing I haven’t been able to ski. My surgeon said losing 10 lbs will make it less likely that

I’ll reinjure myself. I love the sport and have been teaching it for many years. I want to be able to ski again without injury!

COACH LAURI’S SMARTY GOAL

My goal is to: Make my guest room less cluttered

This means I will (make it specific): Take one hour every afternoon after work to go through the piles of stuff in and organize things.

I will measure it by: Fill one storage box a day for one week that I move to the garage or donate.

I believe this goal is accessible to me because: I bought some storage bins and garbage bags and I am also working half-days three days this week.

I think this is relevant because: The guest room is cluttered and the most messy room in the house (because I keep throwing stuff in there when I clean up the other rooms!)

My time frame for doing this is: Every day this week.

My WHY is: Since I moved, I’ve never really gotten settled in and kept throwing everything in the guest room. My brother and his wife want to visit, but the guest room is such a mess! If I can make it less cluttered and more comfortable, then I will be able to rest and enjoy them planning a visit instead of stressing about there being boxes all over the place.

Conclusion

Intuitive eating is one way to respond to how our current culture and food systems have interfered with your body’s messages to you. There are foods that have been designed to trick your body into thinking they’re nutritious, or that promote overeating. Sometimes we’re so busy or stressed, it’s hard to have a moment to tune in. Small changes over time, like pausing and asking yourself “do I truly want to be eating this right now?” can be a way to start eating intuitively.

Again, as Tribole and Resch emphasized, “Progress, not perfection, is what counts.”

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